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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
is up and which way is down, these men have been bipartisan leaders together on this treaty. the u.n. convention on the rights of persons with disabilities has united the seemingly un-unitable. the vote was scheduled today. ratifying a treaty requires 66 yea votes. former senator bob dole was there at the senate for the occasion. in his wheelchair. the decorated wounded combat veteran, the former republican presidential nominee on the floor of the senate. he was there with his wife. so senators had to walk past him in his wheelchair on the way in to vote. and the republicans in the senate voted no. the treaty got 61 votes, but you need a super majority to ratify a treaty and only eight republicans voted for the treaty. it requires nothing of us. 38 republicans voted no. so it failed. forget republican president, john mccain, war hero, bob dole in his wheelchair in the senate, forget our wounded veterans in their wheelchairs, forget them all. republicans are going with rick santorum and the black helicopter theory instead. now this year in 2012. they did that today. amazing. joining u
. >> mr. president, i rise in opposition to the ratification of the u.n. convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. this i understand it's a sensitive topic, one about which many of my constituents on both sides of the issue have strong feelings. certainly most of us that not all of us have a family member or friend with a disability and all of us live in a society that includes the disabled is highly valued members of our communities. i've heard from advocacy groups listing of people who hope and believe that this treaty will protect disabled americans as they travel abroad in mexico about go about their lives. but i've also heard from parents of disabled children who are concerned that this treaty and adherence to the best interests of the child standard and article vii will threaten their rights as parents to determine the best education treatment and care for their disabled children. proponents of the treaty will dismiss those concerns as myth. i simply cannot support a treaty that threatens the right of parents to raise their children with the constantly made for
. the u.n. peace envoy met with u.n. and russian diplomats trying to broker a cease-fire. at the same time there is growing concern tonight over al qaeda's influence in the rebel ranks. david martin is at the pentagon. >> reporter: video said to show the aftermath of a syrian air strike provides graphic evidence of a life-and-death battle which high level diplomats say is bad and getting worse. despite its air power the assad regime appears increasingly on the defensive against rebel forces which according to israel's ambassador to the u.s. include a growing number of radical islamist. >> the jihadi presence is big and getting bigger. and the longer the conflict goes on there, the bigger it will get. >> the jihadies are an offshoot of al qaeda in iraq which ones fought a no holds bar battle against american troops. according to jeffrey white a former analyst for the defense intelligence agency, they are now turning the tide against the assad regime. >> they are very good. they give the rebels a combat edge. they are quite willing to dichlt they fight on all key fronts. they're involved in
points. >> brand-new reaction today from the potential nominee of u.n. ambassador susan rice to be the next secretary of state. a senator reiterating concerns about statements she made following the benghazi attack that left four americans dead. in the meantime, clare mccaskill came to the ambassador's defense. >> she had reviewed the dpeor foer going. >> on sunday shows and went well beyond the talking points, we have decimated al-qaeda, that was nowhere on the talking points, said things the attack was a result of a heinous and offensive video. said the security at our consulate and strong and significant. that is not in the talking points and frankly not supported by the record of what happened. >> the talking points came from the intelligence community. you don't hear one criticism of david petraeus. it was his shop that produced the talking points that susan rice talked about. is there a double standard here? it appears there is, very unfair one. >> gregg: last week rice met with members of the senate armed services committee to try to explain the situation. lindsay grah
debate on the u.n. treaty for the disabled. ♪ ♪ >> this weekend on c-span3's american history tv, follow harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and i, i don't, i don't want to argue survival with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living and to see -- to do what i can to see this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us sunday at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> now, a discussion of how the military and national security might be affected by spending cuts scheduled to take effect the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, was joined by the chairmen of the senate house armed services committee. this is a little less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is. peter:rerson -- peterson. i want to give you, first, a review of our foundation a
say that ratifying the convention would take decisions out of parents' hands and let the u.n. or the federal government decide what's best for our children and that's just wrong. the treaty doesn't give the federal government or any state government new powers. with regard to children with disabilities and the treaty cannot be used as a basis for a lawsuit in state or federal court. former attorney general dick thornburgh made this crystal clear in his testimony before the senate foreign relations committee and in every conversation i've had with him. i would support the treaty if -- i wouldn't support the treaty if it were any other way. let's take a step back and look how this looks if america jeects this treaty. china has joined, russia has joined. we are the country that set the standards on rights for the -- of the disabled. we want everybody to play by international rules. we lose credibility if we turn around and refuse to participate in a treaty that merely asks other nations to live up to our standards, our rules. i'd like to point out that we got a letter from the b
failed to pass a u.n. disability treaty by just five votes. combat veterans like senators john mccain and john kerry delivered impassioned speeches, but dissenting voters said the treaty could pose a threat to national sovereignty. this is a stretch. more than 150 countries have signed the treaty designed to create unilateral rights for people with disabilities. it's actually based on america's ada act which bob dole helped pass more than 20 years ago. and you know, andrea, watching this american hero on the floor, a guy who is disabled, left part of himself, as he has said and others have said, on the battlefields of western europe, coming in and making a plea. i'm really surprised that this was killed by fringe concerns, fringe, fringe concerns. >> and it was, in fact, his fellow senators, several of the people who served with bob dole, who were the key votes here. and john kerry was leading it on the floor with john mccain. it was one of those bipartisan coalitions of veterans, wounded veterans, mccain and others, and the wounded warriors. the chamber of commerce. this is basic
a joint u.n. afghan base. it happened in eastern afghanistan. there are no immediate reports of any casualties. the taliban is claiming responsibility for the attack. joining me now by phone from kabul is journalist ben farmer. ben, the attack is being described as, quote, complex. can you walk us through what happened? >> well, it does seem to be complex and ambitious. it began at about 6:00 local time this morning, just after dawn. it began with two suicide car bomb attacks, attacking the gate of the airfield. the vehicles were packed with explosives and driven towards the gate and detonated. followed a wave of suicide attackers armed with assault rifles, some also wearing suicide vests. they started to attack the gate guards and guards on the walls. it was a two-hour fire fight. during that fire fight, helicopters took off from the airfield to join in the battle to fire down on the attackers. the fire fight took about two hours, at the end of which all the attackers were dead. we believe there were about nine in total, including those in the suicide car bombs. now, the coalition
. the senate has managed to vote on something, rejected a u.n. treaty to extend rights to the blind and disabled, rights that have been the law of the land here in the united states since 1990. despite an emotional appearance from bob dole just out of walter reed, 89 years old, a passionate advocate for equal rights for the disabled since his first speech on the senate floor in 1969. joining me for our daily fix, kra, managing editor of post politics.com and capitol hill correspondents, nbc's kelly o'donnell and luke russert. kelly, to you, because this vote in the senate, john kerry led the way, it was bipartisan, in support. they needed 6 votes. it's a treaty, two-thirds of the senate and it failed. talk to me about all the ramifications here. >> it's not that often andrea, you know this, when votes on the senate floor can draw such powerful emotions and even tears from members of the gallery who attend in the public seats that are not in camera view. but we had that today. there was strong, passionate feelings about this for those in support of the treaty, which essentially as th
of backing that they had from the chinese and russians in terms of blocking the u.n. vote. and it's my -- it's a suicide move. >> reporter: iraq's saddam hussein killed 5,000 kurds with a sarin gas attack in 1988. jim miklaszewski, nbc news, pentagon. >>> back here at home, fiscal cliff negotiations in washington are still up in the air. most lawmakers have gone home for a long weekend break. this as timothy geithner says the obama administration is willing to go over the fiscal cliff. nbc's tracie potts joins us live from washington with an update. good morning to you. >> reporter: let's start with geithner. he told cnbc that instead of continuing tax breaks for the wealthy, the obama administration is willing to go over this cliff which means they're willing to let your taxes go up and unemployment checks go away massive spending cuts happen if the pentagon instead of continuing the tax breaks for the wealthy. now there's been very little progress here on chiapitol hill which is why so many have gone home. we know that president obama and john boehner spoke by phone. republican sources tel
or russia. u.n. secretary general was asked about the asylum question today he did not seem to favor the idea. listen. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity whoever commits gross violation of human rights must be held accountable and should be brought to justice. >> that sentiment was echoed by officials at the u.s. state department who said there has to be, quote: accountability. the counter argument to that is that perhaps anything that gets assad out of syria and stops the slaughter of civilians might be worth thinking about, harris. >> some people may be wondering what happens if in fact assad does go. we still haven't seen united opposition of all those rebels to replace him. >> we certainly have not seen anything like a united opposition. the rebels say that he they are seeking more of a unified political leadership but it is hard to come by because there are so many groups involved in pposition movement from secular democrats who began this simply as a way to gain more democracy in syria to hard line islamist and even al qaeda groups. one of those hard line groups
to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. we believe it is still in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions that because of the nature of the type of missile that they'll be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact that will have on the security environment throughout the region not just on the peninsula. >> [inaudible] from cnn. >> can you -- [inaudible] what's your assessment? they say they've solved whatever problems they had with their april failed launch. what have you seen, what's your assessment, how could they have solved the problems? who might have helped them? do you see iran in there possibly helping them? who else? and do you think he's doing this in response to hard liners in his own government? why would he be doing this? >> well, i think the professed reason is to probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary on the 17th which is widely reported in the paper, in the newspapers. but, you know, my -- our assessment is that their desire to continue down this
of the dictator kim jung un. >> this is against the u.n. security council resolutions and we are monitoring the situation closely. and working very closely with the self-defense force and the ministry of defense. this is a dangerous situation. and we do not support those actions right now by north korea. bill: steven yates, sir, good morning and welcome back here to america's newsroom. it's been some time since we talked about this issue. now it's back and on the plate. >> any time you are dealing with long range missile capability it will be a concern. we have thousands of troops stationed in japan and korea. there is talk of being able to reach los angeles or the western coast. no north korean test so far has reached that near abroad. bill: what would korea want to prove with this launch? >> always dangerous to try to climb into the mind of a north korean leader. but there would have to be a domestic component to the situation. there are important elections taking place in japan on the 16th and south korea on the 19th of this month. well within the range of this test that is scheduled to
and the u.n. special envoy to syria. as you know, russia has blocked action against al assad at the u.n., but some have speculate that had moscow may be considering a different aprove. i mean, is russia stopping the u.s., do you think, from going into syria? >> i think the russians are beginning to realize that this problem simply cannot be ignored, and their passive stance on it simply doesn't provide for any constructive solution, so i hope that they will work with us on this, and i think the more international consensus we have on what is to be done, the less likely is the danger that the removal of the regime will result in the fragmentation of syria all together and regional conflicts erupting. that is the real danger, and that's what people should be concentrating on. >> you know, some have made the comparison that getting involved with syria or in syria is similar to us getting involved in libya and taking action against libya. do you see it that way? >> not quite. i supported strongly the position that the united states took on libya because there was an identifiable enemy, and
, isn't syria like what happened in bosnia? and so many, including u.n. officials have said what's happening in syria is very similar to what's happened in bosnia with the wholesale slaughter of innocent civilians. but i think from the administration's point of view, they're looking at iraq and they don't want to get into an iraq type of multi-year operation. >> and former senator george mitchell has said the united states needs to stay out syria, while senator mccain said they need to get involved. what is at stake? >> they don't want to get bogged down. nobody is talk about putting american boots on the ground. the question is can you take other military measures that will stop this war? i think what you have now, most seasoned observers and most people who look at what could possibly be done to mitigate this nearly two-year war now in which more than 40,000 people, men, women, and children have been slaughtered and after nearly two years of this administration saying, you know, the assad must step down, and it not happening. the best one can hope for, perhaps, is that some kin
blocked u.n. security council efforts to remove the syrian president. that did not stop secretary clinton from saying any plan for syria's future must not involve the man with the blood of so many of his men, women and children. >> the issue stands with the syrian people in insisting that any transition process result in a unifyied democrat syria in which all citizens are represented, a future of this kind cannot possibly we include assad. >> this comes amid reports the syrians have mixed components for the deadly chemical weapon sarin gas. the obama administration has repeatedly wanted if president bashar al-assad of syria uses those weapons there will be consequences. and conor is in the middle east bureau but, first, jennifer, anything to lead us to believe there should be hope following the meeting with secretary of state, hillary clinton? >>reporter: initial assessments are downbeat about resolving the conflict. secretary clinton and the russian foreign minister downplayed expectations of a breakthrough. the leaked intelligence reports of chemical agents being mixed for use by the as
critical of rice following the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> when they go after the u.n. ambassador, apparently because they think she's an easy target, then they got a problem with me. >> senator mccain. >> thank you very much, mr. secreta secretary. >> reporter:. i. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and would be easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> reporter: it is a list that includes michelle flournoy who held the number three job at the pentagon. ashton carter is on the list, and former nebraska senator chuck hagel, a republican, could represent a reach across the aisle. >> we're in a much stronger position today as a country than we were in '07. >> reporter: treasury secretary tim geithner said he will stay at his post until at least inauguration. president obama's chief of staff jack lew is often named as a possible replacement. a poll asked if president obama would pick good cabinet members. 58% said they thought he would. 42% said he would not. emily schmidt, cnn, washington. >> you can read more about the president's potential choices for
of the hour. >> alisyn: right to the headlines, new overnight, between the u.n. and afghanistan air base under attack. and car bombs went off at the gates of the american helicopters firing at the attackers and the taliban has claimed responsibility for this and n.a.t.o. says an afghan security officer was killed and local officers say five civilians were killed. did not make it past the gates. the tragic story this morning, a nfl player shoots and kills his girlfriend before turning the gun on himself. jovan belcher shot and killed his 22-year-old girlfriend in their home and belcher's mother and three month old daughter in another room and he then drove to the chiefs practice facility and met up with the head coach and general manager there before turning away and taking his own life in front of them. >> if you can take your worst nightmare and then put somebody that you know and love into that situation a give them a gun and stand three feet away from them and watch them kill themselves, that's what it's like. it's unfathomable. >> police did not release a motive, but he and his girlfriend
on the agenda when u.s. and russian officials met in geneva today with the u.n. peace envoy. reports say after 21 months of relentless bloodshed, they agreed it was still possible to find a political solution to the crisis. but russian foreign minister sergei lavrov insisted the meeting did not mean moscow's support for syrian president bashar al assad is weakening. fierce fighting threatening to engulf the city of damascus. >>> as that battle for the capital intensifies, the stakes are getting higher in syria, and the regime is getting even more desperate. the pentagon believes government troops have loaded bombs with sarin gas in what may be the last-ditch attempt for president assad to hold onto power. but as barbara starr reports now, a u.s. military strike on syria is not without risk. >> reporter: with the u.s. now believing the syrian government has chemical-filled bombs, cnn has learned the pentagon is secretly updating military strike options for president obama in the event he orders action. a senior u.s. official tells cnn a strike could be carried out with the ships and aircraft al
helped draft the u.n. declaration after her husband's death. today, more than 70 countries recognize the right to hope for health care in the constitution. virtually every industrialized nation has taken steps to implement these rights by establishing some type of universal health coverage for their citizens. .. they volunteer firefighter played a part in the capture of a serial arsonist and san francisco and became friends with author mark twain over drinks and cards and his childhood stories became immortalized in mr. twins books. it all happens tonight on c-span2 book tv. >> so i was thinking about the word to describe your book. i finished reading it. and the only word that came to my mind, and i have to confess, i never used this word, as i was a little bit uncertain, magisterial. the scope, dips, authority of the book was just really pretty staggering in terms of what your government. a lot of wonderful topics that people like me resonate to. net 1951, questions about derivatives, all sorts of questions and issues that about class stiegel. pretty interesting in terms of the dep
be a sign that russia might now be ready to shift its position and support stronger u.n. action against syria. molly henneberg is live at the pentagon keeping an eye on all of these developments. why is russia so important here, molly. >> reporter: russia is one of syria's allies, in fact one of sear kwras onl syria as only allies. and that is why it is thought they may have some sway over syria and bashar al-assad. hillary clinton is in a meeting this afternoon at a security conference in dublin, ireland. they will be meeting today specifically on syria. at the same time the secretary general of the united nations says he also is pressing syria not to use chemical weapons. >> i'm just very much concerned, and i have warned that in any case if chemical weapons is used then they will have to be put to justice and create serious consequences to those people. >> reporter: if president bashar al-assad were to leave the country it would create an immediate problem with who would take over and a secondary problem of who would control the chemical weapons. jon. jon: it is one thing to load ser
will be meeting with her russian counterpart and that u.n. envoy talking about syria. the u.s. and russia have been on opposite sides of that conflict in sirah -- conflict in syria. however today's meeting is suggesting a possible compromising. all of this comes as fox news reports, the syrian military is mixing deadly chemical weapons. the syrian government has not confirmed they have these weapons, saying only it could not use -- it would not use that type of weapon against its people. president obama has warned of serious consequences if the syrian government uses those chemicals in that civil war. >>> allegations of spying on the high seas. the america's cup controversy involving the oracle racing team. >>> and we're looking live outside of traffic. that's the bay bridge toll plaza. tara is coming back, one more commute look. >>> in about 30 minutes a hearing will get underway in san francisco to determine the fate of a pit -- pit bull that attacked a u.s. park patrol officer's horse. the horse named stony was bitten by a pit bull named charlie at crissy field back in august. animal offici
, moscow's support in places like the u.n. security council, the iranians are very worried about upsetting russia's interests in the south caucuses. this is best reflected by iran's position in regards to armenia and georgia where russian interests are strongest. i have provided more detail in my testimony and provided some examples. second, i think we have a failure in tehran's so-called big brother approach which i think is heavily tainted with an ideological syndrome. so i would quickly say it's not just that iran doesn't want to be active in the south caucuses because it fears that the russians might be upset, but it's also because of a failure of its model as a political invitation that is extended over the last 20 years to these three countries, particularly azerbaijan. where russian interests are least sensitive n my view, iran has also failed to gain traction. this is thanks to -- excuse me. where iran has basically insisted on sharing its anti-american and aunt-western portions, and this is a call which the authorities in azerbaijan have repeatedly rejected, i think they would hav
that is occurring and they're now too afraid to return. u.n. secretary general ban ki moon visited this refugee camp in jordan, this is yesterday, and or own cnn's ivan watson is in a sprawling refugee camp on the border with turkey. >> reporter: we're in a camp of around 7,000 syrians on the edge of syria. these people, some of them have been waiting a month, two months to be allowed into turkey. turkey says its refugee camps are full right now. these people have been supplied tents. they get about two meals, hot meals, a day, but everybody here complains that the water is seeping into their tents, and none of these tents really have heat either, so you can see how people are trying to heat up their tea and water, making fires right outside these shelters. now, this is just a fraction of the hoards of people who have been displaced by the conflict in syria. we don't really know the numbers of displaced people inside syria. the united nations says close to half a million have been pushed outside of the country to neighboring countries, like iraq, lebanon, turkey, jordan. the united nations secretary
at state where she doesn't have a good record and her u.n. record is not good. we don't have time to go through the particulars, but i think senator kerry would not only be the policy and political wiser choice. >> everything i've read about ambassador rice, she's imminently qualified for the job. >> you guys can continue this conversation at home right now. thanks to both of you for joining us. >>> the royal line of succession could soon be adding a new name. britain is buzz right now over the news the royal family is about to add another member. ll t in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. >>> catherine duchess of cambridge is pregnant. cnn's royal correspondent max foster is at the epicenter of the madness that's going on right now. the hospital where the duchess has been admitted with acute morning sickness. max, give us the latest. >> reporter: well, i think we're going to be here for months now, wolf. but certainly the kucduchess of
as the u.n. envoy to syria. with so much concern about the threat of chemical weapons at this point, do you think there are any diplomatic options left? >> i think the play -- and hillary clinton met twice today with russian foreign minister lavrov -- is to get russia in the tent with the rest of the world. everyone has predicted, when facts on the ground change, russia will be there. this could be a reset moment for vladimir putin, and he could, because of his unique sway in the area, persuade, i would think, the bashar family to step aside and create a peaceful transition, like the transition in yemen. the opposition is now more broadly representative, and i would hope the russians would see that being on the wrong side of this just creates more carnage, more opportunity for terrorists to get traction there and won't help russia. >> it's a pivotal moment, as we say, a clear tipping point. glad you're back safe and sound from egyp. jane harman, thanks so much for coming in. the jersey shore about to meet the fiscal cliff. grim news for governor christie as he visits washington. >>> plus th
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)